Thursday, January 19, 2012

Reusable Egg Cartons

In my zero waste quest, I've found it frustrating to constantly be saving old egg cartons, only to have them crushed or sullied by everyday wear and tear. I'm sure I'm not the only one looking for a sturdy, washable, reusable egg carton, so I scoured the internet and found these options. Enjoy.

From anthropologie.com:
A beautiful, stoneware, dishwasher-safe egg crate. It's not going to be great for transporting eggs, but it looks wonderful for displaying them. Kind of like a fruit basket, but for eggs. $14.00


From mypetchicken.com:
Ceramic egg holders in six and twelve count that were featured on Martha Stewart. Dishwasher and microwave safe. $8.50 and $13.50. This site also has a nice selection of egg baskets, that's your fancy (good for collecting your own eggs, but it doesn't look practical for taking things to and from the market)(honestly this whole site looks great for anyone looking to raise their own chickens).


From amazon.com:
Lock and lock makes a plastic egg container very similar to a standard egg carton. It has high reviews, comes with free super-saver shipping, and curiously comes in prices of either $11.98 or $6.40, though both prices appear to be for the same product. There is also an InterDesign egg holder for $14.64.

 Kikkerland also makes a ceramic egg rack, also available on amazon. $11.67



From containerstore.com:
The container store makes a plastic egg container built to allow you to keep eggs in the fridge, but also stack things on top of it. That probably means it's sturdy enough to make it to the farmer's market and back. $7.99

From summitcampinggear.com, or in any camping store (or camping section of a store; even Walmart has these):
Camper's pack their eggs in these little containers to take hiking, rafting, or riding. They don't look very attractive (at least to me), but they get the job done. $4.95

From etsy.com:
This isn't an egg carton, but it is a tote bag that's long enough to hold one (or several), unlike the reusable bags I have now. Couple this with one of the plastic egg cartons above, and you're ready to shop. About $15.


I also came across this little internet anecdote that I thought was a neat, old-world way of packaging eggs:


    "This probably wouldn't be any more legal than used egg cartons, and would also be more of a hassle to use, but my DH has told me of the "Egg Man" who delivered eggs when DH was a child in Germany.  The eggs were wrapped in newspaper - 4 or 5 laid side by side, and the paper rolled up around them, and the ends twisted - I envision the little package looking like a large piece of wrapped salt water taffy"

1 comment:

  1. Thank you for this post! I have been looking for re-usable egg cartons on and off for the better part of a year. I stumbled on your site in my most recent attempt. These are all great. Thanks!

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